Friends, first, thank you all so much for your comments and emails this past week — your kind words and enthusiasm have meant so much to my mother and me. Truly, thank you.

In case you missed it, Kristen Miglore of Food52’s Genius Recipes featured the peasant bread in her column last Wednesday, and Food52’s Sarah Jampel featured five variations including one of my favorites, cinnamon-swirl bread. Last Thursday, too, I made the cinnamon-swirl bread with Sarah on Facebook Live.

Today I’m sharing the Bread Toast Crumbs Trailer Part II: Toast along with a toast recipe from the book: Endive and Fava Salad Tartines with Herbed Ricotta. If you have the book, you know by now the Toast chapter is not filled strictly with toast-as-we-know-it recipes: bread + topping. It’s filled rather with recipes that use day old bread in sliced form: sandwiches, tartines, panini, soup, strata, etc. The tartine below (also featured in the video above) is inspired by one my aunt and I shared at Burlington’s South End Kitchen several years ago now. It’s one of my favorites this time of year, when I start craving fresh, crisp, cool vegetables but pickings are still quite slim.

If fresh favas are hard to come by or if their season for you is still months away, know that shelled edamame work just as well. A good, fresh ricotta makes all the difference here, and if you don’t have a good source for one, know that you can make it yourself—it’s easy, promise! Recipe and Facebook Live video are below for the homemade ricotta if you need any guidance.

You will relish this endive and fava tartine—ricotta, pea shoots, radishes, and herbs—each spring-filled bite assuring you that you can endure a few more weeks of winter. This is the tartine to make when you’ve had your fill of comfort foods—of soups and stews and roasts and braises—and you long for something fresh and bright. // alexandracooks-staging.yxqm9184-liquidwebsites.com

Photo by Eva Kolenko

Endive & Fava Tartine with Herbed Ricotta

One March day several years ago, my aunt and I stopped into Burlington, Vermont’s South End Kitchen, an adorable café serving simple, local fare. Bundled in our warmest gear for the outing, braving the snowy roads hugging a frozen-solid Lake Champlain, we relished the tartine we ordered that afternoon—ricotta, pea shoots, radishes, and herbs—each spring-filled bite assuring us we could endure a few more weeks of winter. This is the tartine to make when you’ve had your fill of comfort foods—of soups and stews and roasts and braises—and you long for something fresh and bright. Favas are a laborious treat but can be hard to find; frozen edamame work just as well.

Homemade Ricotta, Facebook Live:

Save the whey! And make bread:

Cinnamon-Swirl Bread:

[tasty-recipe id=”52008″]

[tasty-recipe id=”51240″]